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Arbiter Azariah Profile
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Omega Weapon
 


Reg: 12-2004
Loc: Between madness and insanity.
Posts: 954
Greatness: 92 (+108/-16)
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Re: Private and Parochial Schools.


Currently, private Australian schools receive funding from the state and federal governments. Not all of their funding is supplied by them though, of course. But it wasn't always that way. on the turn of the 20th century, public funding to private schools was repealed over religious concerns.

Most Catholic schools had to make do with what they had. The schools were poor, as were most of the families that sent children to them. They relied heavily on the work of non-paid people in Catholic religious orders.

However, almost exactly 45 years ago, the government threatened to close down a Catholic primary school in Goulburn, NSW if it did not install more toilets. The school didn't have a dollar to spare due to a lack of funding. The local Bishop, along with the people of Goulburn had enough. They forged a plan in which all Catholic schools in Goulburn were simultaneously closed down on the Friday. On the Monday, all of the children were to registered for public schooling. Come Monday, over 1,000 children flooded the public system, which could only take less than half of them.

The Goulburn Strike lasted only a week, but the point was made. Within the decade, State Aid was given to private schools. This was encouraged by Prime Minister Whitlam (who for the record, was a firmly left-wing agnostic).

History aside, the fact of the matter is that it would be foolish not to provide aid to private schools here. The Roman Catholic system alone provides the schools needs for 18% of our population. Other religious and independent schools provide a further 14%. They're providing an essential service to the children and adolescents of the country; why should they not receive at least some State Aid?

Furthermore, the private system is highly regulated. To receive funding, Catholic schools adhere to the curriculum requirements of the state's Curriculum Council, and can have its funding yanked if they don't meet requirements and achieve results. Along with adhering to state demands, Catholic schools also take orders from the state's Catholic Education Office, a highly professional and regulated body that keeps the schools in line.

If you went through my post thinking "tl;dr," (which I hope you didn't! xD) basically I'm saying that independent schools provide an essential service, are usually highly regulated, and should not be denied State Aid.

P.S.: In the interests of full disclosure, I'm currently in the process of studying education, in the hope of gaining qualifications to teach various subjects in the Catholic system. Might as well shed sunlight on my biases. =P

---
Prima: "If we waste any more time on 'weeaboo', we'll be bankrupt by the end of the month!"
Secunda: "Did someone just say 'weeaboo?' Because I heard someone say 'weeaboo'."
Persons 2-10: "Wee-a-boo! Wee-a-boo!"
6/Jul/07, 3:47 am Link 2 this post Email   PM
 
Grenseal Profile
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Ultima Weapon
 


Reg: 11-2003
Loc: Port City Baltimore
Posts: 1111
Greatness: 66 (+81/-15)
Reply Quote
Re: Private and Parochial Schools.


   What you describe sounds a lot different from what we have over here. I like the idea that if the school doesn't meet certain goals they'll have their funding yanked.

    Even after reading what you wrote I still would be wary of giving tax money to a religious based school. Do the catholic schools over there have mandatory masses and religion courses??? I just don't want my money being spent on teaching kids something which I consider to be antiquated flummery. Now if you yank those two things I think the idea becomes a bit more appealing.

---
Icewind Dale II talk

Ulbrec: ...Ennelia and Braston will meet you there, Targos's fate hinges on your success.

My response: I think Targos's fate hinges on how much Shawford can pay us from the Targos treasury.

6/Jul/07, 3:57 am Link 2 this post Email   PM AIM MSN
 
Arbiter Azariah Profile
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Omega Weapon
 


Reg: 12-2004
Loc: Between madness and insanity.
Posts: 954
Greatness: 92 (+108/-16)
Reply Quote
Re: Private and Parochial Schools.


I quite like the idea of regulation, too. Catholic Education values academics, and it only makes sense that they fall in line with the guidelines of the Department of Education and Training. All Catholic schoolteachers are accredited to teach, and teach in accordance to subject guidelines laid out by the Curriculum Council. We also teach subjects assessable for Tertiary entrance.

In regards to your questions, Catholic schools have both RE programs and a few mandatory Masses each year. (Non-compulsory Masses were offered every Wednesday morning before school at my high school.) I remind you once more that not all funding from Catholic schools is provided by the state. A significant chunk comes from private means, in particular the funds the Catholic Archdiocese lays out for these schools.

Religious Educations courses are treated seriously, with their content regulated by the Catholic Education Office. The content is regulated and funded by the Diocese, with religious instruction catered to the ages of the children. For example, year one students may learn about making good and bad choices, whereas a Year 10 deals with more complex moral dilemmas and the theology behind them.

For those harbouring fears over the government capitulating to one religion or sect, bear in mind that the Anglican and Uniting Churches also have a reasonably strong presence in education, and also receive funding. As do the (admittedly fewer) Islamic, Jewish, non-Abrahamistic and non-denominational private schools. Catholic schools seem more dominant simply because they are; they've been focused on education in Australia for over a century.

---
Prima: "If we waste any more time on 'weeaboo', we'll be bankrupt by the end of the month!"
Secunda: "Did someone just say 'weeaboo?' Because I heard someone say 'weeaboo'."
Persons 2-10: "Wee-a-boo! Wee-a-boo!"
6/Jul/07, 4:18 am Link 2 this post Email   PM
 
Cleamatra Profile
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Guardian
 


Reg: 08-2005
Loc: Kuroishi -shi, Aomori Japan
Posts: 388
Greatness: 3 (+40/-37)
Reply Quote
Re: Private and Parochial Schools.


Catholic schools generally have a long history of academic excellence, since their religious views follow a strong history from ancient Greek philosophy and academic excellence was strongly encouraged from early in their history. Protestant traditions have the history of antagonism towards academic and critical thinking.

Despite regulation, I still have qualms towards public funding of private schools.

In your example of the state threatening to shut down private schools due to lack of toilets, I think the state was in the wrong. The state does not have a right to determine how a private educational institutions functions. If parents want to send their kids there, despite the toilet situation, that is their right.

Parents have the right to give their children whatever sort of education they desire. The state was out of their authority to intervene, in my opinion.

---

8/Jul/07, 11:46 am Link 2 this post Email   PM MSN YIM
 
Grenseal Profile
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Ultima Weapon
 


Reg: 11-2003
Loc: Port City Baltimore
Posts: 1111
Greatness: 66 (+81/-15)
Reply Quote
Re: Private and Parochial Schools.


quote:

In your example of the state threatening to shut down private schools due to lack of toilets, I think the state was in the wrong. The state does not have a right to determine how a private educational institutions functions. If parents want to send their kids there, despite the toilet situation, that is their right.




   I think there should be standards, even for private schools. I don't think its right to gyp someone out of a decent education. If a private school is teaching rubbish, or can't attract teachers who are capable of teaching, then I think something should be done. Granted there are a couple of ways you could argue against that but if nothing is done about the situation what you have is children being sent to a school where they really aren't being properly prepared. If an institution degrades to this point I wouldn't even call it a school anymore.

---
Icewind Dale II talk

Ulbrec: ...Ennelia and Braston will meet you there, Targos's fate hinges on your success.

My response: I think Targos's fate hinges on how much Shawford can pay us from the Targos treasury.

9/Jul/07, 4:31 am Link 2 this post Email   PM AIM MSN
 


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